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Case study – Shelly

*Name changed for confidentiality reasons*

Shelly was a 16 year old female who I worked with for a period of approximately 6 months. The aim of the provision was to support her integration at a new part time college placement that was different from her usual school. She was placed at the college due to her struggling to manage at the school full time, and was close to being transferred due to not being able to meet her needs. Therefore it was incredibly important that her integration at the college worked out.

Shelly was a young person who suffered from complex trauma, mainly related to incidents involving childhood abuse and neglect. She was put into foster care around the age of 6 with her twin sister. Shelly would sometimes identify as a male and develop attractions towards members of the same biological sex as her. 

Shelly would generally present herself as an amicable person, but would frequently exhibit bouts of extreme rage that would arise from any perceived injustice and could become violent towards her peers. Shelly would also be prone to anxiety, self harm and suicidal threats, regularly contacting child line stating she was going to commit suicide.

Shelly exhibited aspects of fantacism, sometimes appearing to have conversations with people or entities that were her ‘imaginary friends’ as she put it. Shelly had an extremely vivid imagination and by no means lacked intelligence. She had a good understanding of trauma but would often use this to her advantage, often to make up elaborate stories about why she could not do something (which were usually school work related). 

One time she mentioned that she could not draw a circle because it reminded her of a bubble, and a bubble reminded her of being aged 6 witnessing abuse in her house, during which time, she would imagine a protective bubble around her. (This was all avoidance to doing school work, as I had seen her draw circles on numerous other occasions).

During my time with Shelly assisting her at college, she made massive progress in terms of her ability to emotionally regulate, along with her engagement with her education.

One of the main strategies that was used with Shelly was remaining extremely consistent when it came to enforcing boundaries and expectations. Shelly would often attempt to manipulate staff that worked with her by using an array of methods. There were 3 main behaviors she would use to try and achieve this. The first was by being very charming (usually after being in trouble and wanting to get out of it), the second was crying and apparent emotional breakdowns and the third was anger and insults. These could also be exhibited in any combination and any order and in any time frame.

These behaviors would often arise due to fairly minor situations, such as wanting to use her i-pad (which became a useful tool for issuing consequences) or not wanting to go to her lesson.

Whether she would try to use charm, anger or sadness to get her way, the boundaries set and expectations were still upheld. This was done by remaining calm and centered along with providing empathy to her feelings, whilst remaining firm to the outcome expected, so that she would learn that whatever she threw at me, it would not take me off my center. This allowed for her trust to grow in me as a capable adult she could depend upon to lead her through the trials and tribulations of life she faced. I would also at times make use of humour to either elevate her mood, and even to get her too situations from a different perspective.

To begin with there were numerous situations where Shelly would not be happy at not getting her own way, but over time she began to understand that I would not be swayed by emotional manipulation and her behavior became much more balanced and stable. (Note: This is not to say she consciously chose these behaviors, but more that they were learned in order to get her needs met as she grew up).

Other scenarios would occur where she would do things such as show off scars on her wrists or flash a razor blade she had stolen from a pencil sharpener, boasting (with a smirk on her face) how she was going to use it to cut herself. I soon recognised and understood that much of her behavior was mostly linked to gaining attention and reactions. My method for dealing with this was not to provide much reaction at all. I would still tell her that seeing her hurt herself was not funny or cool to me, and to remove the razor blade off her if she had one, but to generally give it no further attention. Again over time instances such as this became less frequent.

When it came to situations that involved helping her to process her trauma I used methods such as drawings/cartoons and brainstorming to help understand and figure out what she was feeling and to put things into perspective. A large part of the work around this was done on helping her to let go and move on from the past. She had a lot of unresolved feelings regarding her relationship with her birth mum, and was unable to visualize a positive future whilst she clung to the past. I helped her to step outside of the mother/daughter relationship paradigm through which her perception was tainted, and instead see her mother and an individual who probably had a difficult upbringing herself, and was an individual with her own issues and floors. This helped Shelly to begin to remove her lack of self worth from how she was treated by her birth mother.

I identified that she displayed what is known as psychological ‘splitting’ which is a form of black and white thinking. This is generally where someone thinks of someone else as either ‘all good’ or ‘all bad’ depending on the circumstances and can change numerous times throughout the day depending on the circumstances. This tends to be a behavior prone to people with personality disorders such as Borderline personality disorder (BPD).

In order to de-escalate or diffuse emotional outbursts before they began, I employed techniques from the http://www.nicolamethodforhighconflict.com/ which is a communication style aimed at disarming verbal confrontations from people who suffer from BPD. (I would like to mention that BPD was not officially recognised in people under 18 until recently, and Shelly has no diagnosis of it, but regardless her behavior was congruent with that of someone who suffered from it, and the techniques for helping to manage it worked.) Using the techniques shown in the Nicola method enabled me to not get drawn into the numerous attempts at starting an argument she often tried to start. It also enabled me to remain calm and unswayed by the things she said to me.

I also performed some mini workshops with her focussing on subjects around emotional intelligence and self management. To complement this I taught her ‘Emotional Freedom technique (EFT) which involves tapping various pressure points around the body, whilst simultaneously repeating a positive mantra of affirmation, and help the person to release the emotional energy trapped in the body. 

The final aspect I worked on with Shelly was helping her to manage/overcome her anxiety and not let it control her life. This was mainly done by encouraging her to act with courage and to take small steps outside of her comfort zone, gradually taking bigger ones as time went on. Shelly made massive progress with this over the course of 6 months, from initially not being able to bring herself to attend any lessons without me supporting her, or being the center of attention in a social setting (such as talking to a group) to being able to attend all lessons without me and even playing a small part in circus performance put on by her school.

Shelly successfully integrated into her college placement, and since went on to attend there full time after my intervention ceased.

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Case study – Sean

*Name changed for confidentiality reasons

Sean who was at a young man aged 15 who was on the brink of being expelled from his school for consistent disruptive behavior including rudeness and aggression to teaching staff. He also had mild involvement in drug dealing and regularly smoked cannabis.

Over a period of 6 months the mentor from the BE A Warrior Foundation performed mentoring and boxing sessions with him. The sessions would involve picking him up from school and taking him to the local boxing gym. The boxing sessions gave the mentor key insights into how he handled things such as being stressed or not being able to perform the skills showed to him. This also enabled the mentor to talk to him about these insights in a way he could understand due to experiencing them himself. Sean realized how unfit he was due to smoking cannabis, so he decided to stop.

The mentor discussed with Sean about his attitude towards teachers and the aspirations he had for himself. He was given strategies to manage his anger more effectively and how to respond to teachers when they told him off along with tools to avoid situations escalating that would get him in trouble.

Sean put these strategies to use and managed to avoid being expelled, he ended up passing his GCSE’s and ended up going on to college.

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Case study – Craig

*Name is changed for confidentiality reasons.

Craig was a young man aged 15 who had not been in education for over 2 years. He regularly suffered from explosive episodes of rage, smoked cannabis and was involved in low level drug dealing with county lines.

Over the period of 8 months our mentor from the BE A Warrior Foundation (BAWF) managed to get him into boxing training and he stopped smoking cannabis. Craig also decided that he no longer wanted to sell drugs and stopped hanging around with the others who were involved in it. 

The mentor helped him find the direction he wanted to head in life and managed to convince him to go back to school. Due to his school being in a different county the mentor had to drive him to school. He also would only attend if the mentor was with him. He even referred to his mentor as his ‘Dad’ on one occasion.

Craig in the end managed to gain his foundation GCSE’s in Maths and English and has now gone on to college.

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How the benefits of boxing help people manage ADHD

How the benefits of boxing help people manage ADHD

Did you know that boxing training can be beneficial for people to help them manage ADHD? In fact, boxing has been shown to help improve focus, concentration, discipline and resilience. It can also help reduce stress and anxiety levels. Not only is it great for kids who have hyperactivity and lots of energy to burn off but also great for helping manage adult ADHD too. If you are looking for a way to better manage your ADHD symptoms, boxing may be the answer!

How exactly does boxing with managing ADHD?
Boxing is a high-intensity sport that requires total mind and body involvement. You have to be aware of your surroundings, your opponent, and your own body movements along with being able to regulate your emotions in real time in order to not lose control and fight effectively. All of this has a positive effect on your own personal ability to manage ADHD. Lets now talk more in depth about how the benefits of boxing and training involved help with the different aspects of ADHD.

Concentration
During activities such as hitting the bag, pad work and most importantly sparring, you have to remain focussed on the activity at hand. There is not time to let your mind wander when you are sparring against an opponent as you have to be ready to respond to their every move. This level of concentration required is practiced during activities such as hitting the bag or pad work, and the thought of being punched in the face if your don’t stay focussed provides added motivation to develop this skill.

Over time you will become more adept at being able to turn on a laser like focus when the situation requires it. The process of actively working on maintaining concentration during training leads to the brain developing more neural connections for this ability, meaning you are able to apply your concentration to other tasks not related to boxing.

Boxing training is a brilliant activity to do before activities such as studying or work that requires concentration as it releases endorphins and dopamine which make the mind more alert.

Impulsivity
Boxing can help you to manage ADHD symptoms such as impulsiveness, which can often lead to people doing things that they later regret because they didn’t think about the consequences first.

Boxing training helps you to control your impulses because you have to have a very high level of self control when sparring or fighting competitively. You can’t just throw punches aimlessly without thinking about what you’re doing, because you waste energy and make yourself more vulnerable to being counter punched. Likewise you also become able to stop yourself mid punch in situations such as sparring if the situation requires it. This self-control can carry over into other areas of your life, such as when you come into conflict with other people or even when your boss is rude to you.

As with concentration your brain develops neurologically providing you greater impulse control abilities.

Hyperactivity
For kids who have ADHD and bundles of energy, boxing training is one of the best ways for them to burn it all off, as boxing training is one of the most energy consuming work outs you can do. It makes use of all 3 of the different energy systems, to include the aerobic, anaerobic and AT-PCR system. For adults with ADHD who no longer have the hyperactive aspect, boxing training is a great way to help alleviate in the internal feeling of restlessness.

Emotional regulation
One of the biggest challenges for people to manage ADHD is being subject to extremely high intensity emotions. In particular that of anger or ‘rage’ when upset. This often causes problems in particular when it comes to social interactions and handling conflict.

Boxing training helps you learn to manage your emotions because you have to be in control of your anger when you’re boxing. If you get too angry, you won’t be able to think straight and you could make a mistake that gets you hurt. In particular developing the ability to not act on your anger is the first step to getting it under control. This ability is gradually built up during training when the person learns to tolerate and persist by the pain that is felt by certain exercises and activities. Further development in this area is provided from activities such as sparring and works in relation to learning how to control the adrenaline released from the ‘fight or flight response’.

Boxing training is also a great way to improve your mood in general. The endorphins and dopamine that are released when you work out have a positive effect on your mood and can help to combat depression. Working out is one of the best ways to relieve stress and feel good.

Developing self discipline
Due to the nature of ADHD it is incredibly important for people who have it to develop a greater level of self discipline than would otherwise be required for neurotypical people.

Boxing training is great for building self discipline, as the sport provides a very obvious real time feedback loop of how the training you have done (or lack of) translates into your performance in the ring. This provides a very high level of motivation to work hard in the training and creates an understanding of self responsibility.

As mentioned earlier you also will develop an improved tolerance to pain enabling you to face uncomfortable situations head on (a core part of discipline) rather than avoidance, and learn to just get on with things. This provides help with things such as procrastination or getting on with activities you find difficult outside of the boxing gym.

A safe alternative to other risk taking behaviors
People with ADHD are very often people who take unsafe risks as they are addicted to the adrenaline they get from such activities.
The feeling of the adrenaline rush from boxing sparring is very similar to the feeling that people with adhd get from doing things like taking risks or being in scenarios that involve a lot of noise and action. Boxing gives you something to get those adrenaline highs in a natural, safe and controlled way.

Building confidence and self esteem
Boxing training can provide a sense of accomplishment and boost self-esteem. When you achieve something in boxing, such as mastering a new skill, improving in sparring or even winning a fight, it feels great! This improved self-esteem can carry over into other areas of your life.

Achieving mini goals
A key aspect of building confidence is that it needs to be done incrementally, a bit like building fitness or strength. Often people with ADHD have very low levels of self confidence due to facing many challenges and ‘failure’ throughout their lives.

The first step back on to the path of building confidence back up is to achieve mini ‘wins’. An example of this is with activities such as skipping. Simply improving the number of ‘skips’ that are completed each session, gives real time feed of how improvements are being made. Seeing results such as these improve week on week really has an amazing ability to build your confidence. You will then start to believe in yourself and your ability to achieve in other areas of your life.

Boxing also builds an incredible level of self confidence due to developing the ability to defend yourself. You do not have to worry so much about conflict with other people when you know you can defend yourself. This is because you are less likely to enter the ‘fight or flight’ response and manage situations more calmly.(Meaning you are less likely to end up in a fight).

You will also feel less anxiety around interactions with other people in general.

Improving your overall quality of life
Boxing training not only helps with these aspects of ADHD, but also is beneficial in so many other ways for your life in general. It will get you fitter and healthier than you have ever been. You will get many other physical benefits such as improved coordination and reaction times and will develop a great physique too (which also helps boost your confidence)

Best of all you will gain a fun and engaging hobby to participate in and meet many new people. There is also the aspect of going on to box competitively yourself and going to watch your friends boxing at events themselves too.

Boxing is becoming more recognized for its benefits for ADHD
Check out this article from the BBC about how boxing is being used to work with kids excluded from mainstream education who have ADHD.

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-48720809

Get started with boxing today!!
If you’re ready to start seeing real results and improvements in challenges caused by your ADHD brain, the ‘Zero to Hero’ 12 week boxing transformation course is the perfect choice for you.

You will learn about all the different aspects of boxing, fitness, weight loss and nutrition (including monthly recipes sent directly to your inbox).

For more information please check out the ‘Learn More’button below.

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Adam Azim wins 3rd pro fight by KO stoppage live on Sky sports

Adam Azim wins 3rd pro fight by KO stoppage live on Sky sports

Adam Azim who is a professional boxer aged 19 from Slough won his 3rd fight against Jordan Ellison by KO stoppage in the 3rd round live on Sky sports. He was fighting on the Amir Khan vs Kell Brook undercard. Adam is hailed as an amazing future talent by many boxing pundits.

This is great news for Boxing Evolution coaching as Adam Azim first started boxing aged 7 when he attended the Boxing Evolution summer camp. His Dad initially wanted Adam to get involved with boxing because he had so much excess energy due to having ADHD. ‘I was really hyperactive as a kid and dad wanted me to be a boxer because I was so enthusiastic,’ Adam recalls. ‘I had ADHD and needed something to drain my energy, so we went to the local boxing gym and started from there.’ as Adam tells the Daily Mail.

Adam showed incredible natural talent and was extremely game for such a young lad. During his time at the summer camp he also completed the A.B.A boxing award scheme.

Adam then continued on a one to one basis with Boxing Evolution coaching for a number of years during which time he progressed to an extremely advanced level for his age. Adam Azim went on to enjoy a decorated amateur career that included 10 national titles and was ranked the No 1 Youth Amateur welterweight in the world. He is now currently being trained by Shane McGuigan. Commenting on Adam recently Shane has said,

“I think he’s going to go right to the top. I think he’s going to win world titles and do huge things for British boxing. Everyone has to get behind him.”

Here is Adam Azim aged 8 years old is on the pads developing his head movement and footwork.

Check out Adam’s improvement in sparring over a period of only 4 months after being coached by Boxing Evolution.

It is incredibly important to develop these important and fundamental skills from a young age to ensure unconscious competency later on. All of these skills are built upon the foundations of stance, guard, footwork and punch technique. If these basics are not developed properly there will be weaknesses in any techniques built upon them.

Adam is truly a testament to the Boxing Evolution philosophy of developing your full potential and how much sports such as boxing can help with neurological divergence issues such as ADHD. Read more about how Boxing helps with ADHD and how Boxing Evolution can help you by clicking the link below.

https://www.boxingevolution.com/articles/the-benefits-of-boxing-for-people-with-adhd/

If you would like to get started with the sport of boxing then check out the 12 week ‘Zero to Hero’ boxing body transformation course.

You will learn about all the different aspects of weight loss, nutrition (including monthly recipes) and developing fitness along with learning real boxing skills. There is no better way to lose weight and get in shape than with boxing!

For more information please check out the ‘Learn More’button below.

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[FREE RECIPE] – High protein pancakes with blueberry sauce and almond caramel

This recipe is perfect for those early mornings when you need to get off to a flying start with lots of energy for a completely productive day, all whilst helping keep that calorie count low…

If you would like to know more information about weight loss please register your email address below for a copy of the Boxing Evolution FREE nutrition report.




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I Like to Snack in The Evening or Watching A Movie, But I Don’t Want to Sabotage My Goals; What Should I Do?

Snack cravings are a dieter’s worst enemy. Cravings and lack of physical exercises are the top reasons why many people find it hard to lose weight.

Here Is What You Should Do:

Eat proteins
Eating lean protein reduces appetite, which keeps you from overeating.

Plan your meals.
Know what you’re going to eat and at what time to eliminate uncertainty and spontaneity issues.

Eat spinach extract
Spinach extract is obtained from spinach leaves. This type of vegetable delays digestion as well as reduces cravings and appetite for many hours

Eat balanced nutritious meals
Lack of nutrients and hunger causes cravings; don’t wait until you are too hungry to eat. Find a healthy snack between meals (like yoghurt).

Implement mindful eating
Mindful eating helps you in developing your eating habit awareness. It also controls your emotions, physical sensations, hunger and cravings.

The Bottom Line
Following the tips above, eat more proteins, plan your meals and also practice some mindful eating to take charge of the next cravings. Craving unhealthy foods is very common, so satisfy your craving urge without wrecking your diet.

If you would like to know more about nutrition for weight loss please register your email address below for a copy of the Boxing Evolution FREE nutrition report.




 

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Should You Drink Milk?

Cow’s milk has been touted as a go-to source of calcium for a long time. However, let’s go past the spin: is milk really necessary for you? How bad is milk for your health? You’ve got health problems waiting for you.

Here are the reasons why:

❖ Milk and cheese are linked to increased risk of developing prostate cancer.

❖ Lactose in cow’s milk might be difficult for people to digest (lactose intolerance) resulting in gas, cramps, nausea, bloating and even diarrhea.

❖ Multiple studies have shown that consumption of dairy milk increases prevalence and the severity of acne on both girls and boys.

❖ A Swedish research study showed that when women consume four or more servings of milk each day, they are twice at risk of developing severe ovarian cancer.

❖ Dairy milk can potentially elicit strong and dangerous milk allergies (vomiting and anaphylaxis), especially in young children.

❖ Milk can surge antibiotic-resistant bacteria due to rampant overuse of antibiotics to keep the cos alive and on top gauge when it comes to milk production.

❖ A study on more than 12,000 children showed that milk increases the chances of weight gained due to high saturated-fat content.

But what about calcium? No – you don’t need milk for that; you can and will get your calcium from other sources like fish and nuts.

If you would like to know more about nutrition for weight loss please register your email address below for a copy of the Boxing Evolution FREE nutrition report.




 

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Foods/ Drinks You Should Avoid in Your Healthy Diet

It’s very easy to get confused on which foods/drinks are healthy for your body and which aren’t.

Generally, you need to avoid certain foods/drinks to lose weight, prevent chronic illness, to keep fit and also to keep a healthy body.

Here is a list of unhealthy foods/drinks you can consume in moderation during special occasions without any permanent damage to your health.

❖ Sugary drinks (sugary drinks fasten obesity and weight gain)

❖ Some pizzas (junk food made from unhealthy ingredient like refined dough and the processed meat)

❖ White bread (low in fiber)

❖ Fried, grilled or boiled food (highly palatable and dense in calories)

❖ Cakes, pastries and cookies (copious calories, no essential nutrients and the many preservatives)

❖ Potato chips and french fries (with large amounts of acrylamides that are carcinogenic substances)

❖ Gluten free junk foods (trigger rapid spike of blood sugar level, also low on essential nutrients)

❖ Low-fat yoghurt (choose full-fat yoghurt)

❖ Low-carb junk food (highly processed with additives)

❖ Ice cream (high in calories)

❖ Processed meat (cause diabetes, heart disease and colon cancer)

Focus on whole foods to steer healthy diet!

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How To Get Rid Of A Bad Habit

Getting rid of a bad habit is not a walk in the park. It’s a daunting task that requires much simpler “step by step” strategies, inclusive of a healthier habit.

Everyone has a habit that doesn’t please his/her personality. The great thing is that we have all been granted wisdom and capabilities to change bad habits.

It’s a tough experience trying to replace a bad habit with a good habit.

How to Boot Bad Habit Out of Your Life

Let it go: Take it deep into the recesses of your heart to fight to eliminate the bad habit. Be ready and willing.

Create a positive list of reasons as to why you don’t need the bad habit again: Start with dramatic and powerful reasons that you can memorize.

Choose to do it: “I’m choosing change!” Once you have the required details to kick out the bad habit, narrow down on one thing, act of will and choose to accomplish it.

Take action: Work diligently toward the planned objective.

Recover from failures: Withstand the setback and don’t turn back. Chalk your goal with experience.

Reward yourself: Congratulate yourself regularly. Small victories will allow you to plan for big ones and at the end you will be sure of a good habit.

Want to learn more about boxing, fitness, nutrition and weight loss?

Boxing Evolution has the perfect solution with our very own ‘Zero to Hero’ boxing body transformation course.

You will learn about all the different aspects of weight loss, nutrition (including monthly recipes) and developing fitness along with learning real boxing skills. There is no better way to lose weight and get in shape than with boxing!

For more information please check out the ‘Learn More’button below.

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